A Vitally Important Quick Education On Watches:

The movement is the "Engine" of a watch. There are countless different movements, but to simplify this there are two distinct categories: Quartz ( battery operated ) or Mechanical ( wind up ). 

                 Mechanical Watch                                    Quartz Watch

                                    (Wind Up Watch)                                                                   (Battery Operated Watch)

 

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS:
Q- How do I know if my watch is mechanical or battery operated?
A- To easily differentiate movement categories look at the second hand. If you see a smooth sweeping motion it is a mechanical wind up watch...if you see a "tick tick" motion that moves once per second, this is a battery driven movement.
 

Q- What is the best way to store my Quartz movement watch if I'm not wearing it for extended periods of time?
A- If you do not plan to wear the watch for a year or longer, the battery should be removed by a qualified jeweler or watch specialist. Save the old battery so it can easily be replaced by corresponding numbers. It is not recommended to pull the stem out to stop the watch. The old battery can leak and permanently destroy the movement.
 

Q- How long can I expect a new battery to last?
A- 12-15 months minimum, however some movements can continue to work for several years. Watches with various functions can shorten the lifespan of the one battery or use more than one battery.
 

Q- Is one movement recommended over another?
A- Watch preference is really based on personal taste and budget. Do your homework before you purchase a finer watch. Maintenance and repairs can be costly.


RE-TIPPING

Worn Prongs

So... What does "Re-tipping" mean? 

Re-tipping is nothing more than building up the prongs so that they are durable again.

Because of the incredible abuse some jewelry receives during the course of wear, prongs have a tendency to get bent, broken, caught, cracked, and worn (as depicted in the illustration above).

Dirt buildup also hastens the wear of your jewelry. Visit your jeweler at least twice per year to have your fine jewelry professional cleaned and inspected for worn prongs, faulty clasps, or other potential problems. 

how Can I tell if my prongs are worn?

If you run your fingers over the tops of the prongs, you should be able to feel all the small rounded "nubs" of metal. If the prongs feel smooth and flat, and are even with the gemstone, this is a warning sign that it is time to bring the piece in for maintenance. Additionally, if you hear any stones rattling, or are constantly snagging on clothes and various fabrics, this is a tell-tale indication that your stones may be in jeopardy of falling out. 

As always, it is better to be safe than sorry. If ever in doubt, bring your jewelry into My Jewel Shop for a free consultation, and our jewelers' will be more than happy to assist you.


Be Informed

Rob and Linda have forever believed that educating our clientele makes for happy customers. Here, we will feature tips, tricks, and helpful advice for jewelry lovers, old and new. 

DIY? DI-DON’T!

In lieu of a number of repairs that have recently come into the shop, we feel that it never hurts to reiterate some basic jewelry 101. You can avoid costly repairs by first referring to a jeweler before tackling a “fix-it” on your own. 

What often may seem like a quick jewelry repair or adjustment requires specialty tools that you may or may not have in your repertoire. Countless customers come in assuming that they can add a jump ring, close a spring ring, remove links from watchbands, etc. and in almost all cases, the client damages or severely mars the surface of the piece. If in any doubt, stop in for a consultation! Our jeweler’s are always happy to assist you with even the most minor repairs, and in most cases, small adjustments can be done immediately. 

With a fully functioning jeweler’s shop on premises, My Jewel Shop has the appropriate tools to perform any jewelry alterations. Just remember, it is always easier to modify an undamaged piece rather than working with compromised parts.